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Reference: Rayfield, S and Plugge, E, (2016). Systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between maternal smoking in pregnancy and childhood overweight and obesity. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.Citable link to this page:

 

Systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between maternal smoking in pregnancy and childhood overweight and obesity

Abstract: Background: By 2020, it is predicted that 60 million children worldwide will be overweight. Maternal smoking in pregnancy has been suggested as a contributing factor. Our objective was to systematically review studies on this, thereby expanding the evidence base for this association.Methods: Systematic review with meta-analysis, Prospero Registration number CRD42012002859. We searched PubMed, Embase, Global Health, Web of Science and the Grey literature. We included prevalence, cohort and cross-sectional studies involving full-term, singleton pregnancies. Published and unpublished studies through to 1 January 2015 in all languages, demonstrating an objective overweight outcome up until 18 years of age and data presented as an OR, were included. Quality assessment was undertaken using an adaption of the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager V.5.3.Findings: The meta-analysis included 39 studies of 236 687 children from Europe, Australia, North America and South America and Asia. Maternal smoking in pregnancy ranged from 5.5% to 38.7%, with the prevalence of overweight from 6.3% to 32.1% and obesity from 2.6% to 17%. Pooled adjusted ORs demonstrated an elevated odds of maternal smoking in pregnancy for childhood overweight (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.28 to 1.46, I2 45%) and childhood obesity (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.40 to 1.73, I2 24%).Interpretation: Our results demonstrate an association between maternal prenatal smoking and childhood overweight. This contributes to the growing evidence for the aetiology of childhood overweight, providing important information for policymakers and health professionals alike in planning cessation programmes or antismoking interventions for pregnant female smokers.

Publication status:PublishedPeer Review status:Peer reviewedVersion:Accepted ManuscriptDate of acceptance:10 July 2016Notes:This is the accepted manuscript version of the article. The final version is available online from BMJ Publishing Group at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2016-207376

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group

Publisher Website: http://jech.bmj.com/

Journal: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Healthsee more from them

Publication Website: http://jech.bmj.com/

Volume: 71

Issue Date: 2016Identifiers

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2016-207376

Issn: 1470-2738

Uuid: uuid:4d03acd6-8baa-4250-a22d-963d83d6c85a

Urn: uri:4d03acd6-8baa-4250-a22d-963d83d6c85a

Pubs-id: pubs:648343 Item Description

Type: journal-article;

Version: Accepted Manuscript

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Author: Rayfield, S - Oxford, MSD, NDM, Tropical Medicine - - - Plugge, E - Oxford, MSD, NDM, Tropical Medicine - - - - Bibliographic Det

Source: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:4d03acd6-8baa-4250-a22d-963d83d6c85a



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