Effective emotion regulation strategies improve fMRI and ECG markers of psychopathology in panic disorder: implications for psychological treatment actionReport as inadecuate




Effective emotion regulation strategies improve fMRI and ECG markers of psychopathology in panic disorder: implications for psychological treatment action - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Reference: Reinecke, Andrea, Filippini, N, Berna, C et al., (2015). Effective emotion regulation strategies improve fMRI and ECG markers of psychopathology in panic disorder: implications for psychological treatment action. Translational Psychiatry.Citable link to this page:

 

Effective emotion regulation strategies improve fMRI and ECG markers of psychopathology in panic disorder: implications for psychological treatment action

Abstract: Impairments in emotion regulation are thought to have a key role in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders, but the neurobiological underpinnings contributing to vulnerability remain poorly understood. It has been a long-held view that exaggerated fear is linked to hyperresponsivity of limbic brain areas and impaired recruitment of prefrontal control. However, increasing evidence suggests that prefrontal-cortical networks are hyperactive during threat processing in anxiety disorders. This study directly explored limbic-prefrontal neural response, connectivity and heart-rate variability (HRV) in patients with a severe anxiety disorder during incidental versus intentional emotion regulation. During 3 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging, 18 participants with panic disorder and 18 healthy controls performed an emotion regulation task. They either viewed negative images naturally (Maintain), or they were instructed to intentionally downregulate negative affect using previously taught strategies of cognitive reappraisal (Reappraisal). Electrocardiograms were recorded throughout to provide a functional measure of regulation and emotional processing. Compared with controls, patients showed increased neural activation in limbic-prefrontal areas and reduced HRV during incidental emotion regulation (Maintain). During intentional regulation (Reappraisal), group differences were significantly attenuated. These findings emphasize patients' ability to regulate negative affect if provided with adaptive strategies. They also bring prefrontal hyperactivation forward as a potential mechanism of psychopathology in anxiety disorders. Although these results challenge models proposing impaired allocation of prefrontal resources as a key characteristic of anxiety disorders, they are in line with more recent neurobiological frameworks suggesting that prefrontal hyperactivation might reflect increased utilisation of maladaptive regulation strategies quintessential for anxiety disorders.

Publication status:PublishedPeer Review status:Peer reviewedVersion:Publisher's version Funder: G0501223/Medical Research Council   Notes:This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0International License. The images or other third party material in thisarticle are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicatedotherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commonslicense, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce thematerial. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: Nature

Publisher Website: http://www.nature.com/

Journal: Translational Psychiatrysee more from them

Publication Website: http://www.nature.com/tp/about/for_authors.html?WT.mc_id=BAN_TP_2016_CFP

Volume: 5

Extent: e673

Issue Date: 03 November 2015Identifiers

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/tp.2015.160

Issn: 2158-3188

Uuid: 0d7733c9-5ef3-4da7-9699-0a915b2915a8

Urn: uri:0d7733c9-5ef3-4da7-9699-0a915b2915a8

Pubs-id: 586260 Item Description

Type: journal-article;

Language: eng

Version: Publisher's versionKeywords: Adult Brain Brain Mapping Electrocardiography Emotions Female Humans Magnetic Resonance Imaging Male Panic Disorder Photic Stimulation Socioeconomic Factors Journal Article

Relationships





Author: Reinecke, Andrea - Oxford, MSD, Psychiatry Default-Not Applicable - - - Filippini, N - - - Berna, C - - - Western, DG - - - Hanso

Source: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:0d7733c9-5ef3-4da7-9699-0a915b2915a8



DOWNLOAD PDF




Related documents