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Reference: Alcock, KJ, Abubakar, A, Newton, C et al., (2016). The effects of prenatal HIV exposure on language functioning in Kenyan children: establishing an evaluative framework. BMC Research Notes, 9 (1), 463.Citable link to this page:

 

The effects of prenatal HIV exposure on language functioning in Kenyan children: establishing an evaluative framework.

Abstract: BackgroundHIV infection has been associated with impaired language development in prenatally exposed children. Although most of the burden of HIV occurs in sub-Saharan Africa, there have not been any comprehensive studies of HIV exposure on multiple aspects of language development using instruments appropriate for the population.MethodsWe compared language development in children exposed to HIV in utero to community controls (N = 262, 8–30 months) in rural Kenya, using locally adapted and validated communicative development inventories.ResultsThe mean score of the younger HIV-exposed uninfected infants (8–15 months) was not significantly below that of the controls; however older HIV-exposed uninfected children had significantly poorer language scores, with HIV positive children scoring more poorly than community controls, on several measures.ConclusionsOur preliminary data indicates that HIV infection is associated with impaired early language development, and that the methodology developed would be responsive to a more detailed investigation of the variability in outcome amongst children exposed to HIV, irrespective of their infection status.

Publication status:PublishedPeer Review status:Peer reviewedVersion:Publisher's versionDate of acceptance:2016-10-01 Funder: National Institute of Mental Health   Notes:© 2016 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: BioMed Central

Publisher Website: http://www.biomedcentral.com/

Journal: BMC Research Notessee more from them

Publication Website: http://bmcresnotes.biomedcentral.com/

Volume: 9

Issue: 1

Extent: 463

Issue Date: 2016-10

pages:463Identifiers

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-016-2264-3

Issn: 1756-0500

Uuid: uuid:9e07af0e-0eab-4261-a29a-8c4ab125eba7

Urn: uri:9e07af0e-0eab-4261-a29a-8c4ab125eba7

Pubs-id: pubs:655180 Item Description

Type: journal-article;

Language: eng

Version: Publisher's versionKeywords: Africa Children HIV Language

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Author: Alcock, KJ - - - Abubakar, A - - - Newton, C - Oxford, MSD, Psychiatry St Johns College fundingWellcome Trust - - - Holding, P -

Source: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:9e07af0e-0eab-4261-a29a-8c4ab125eba7



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