Student Produced Television Programs: The Relationship of Play Theory, Flow Experiences, and Experiential Learning.Report as inadecuate




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Television production is a complicated task. It requires advanced technical skills and abilities, as well as tremendous creative input. It requires an outlying of time by an individual to learn the skills and implement the creative ideas he or she might have for a television show. A study examined the perceptions of 30 students who were highly involved in creating student television programming at Pepperdine University. The students interviewed were not receiving scholarship funding, work study, or class credit for their production work. The study sought to determine what motivates these students to devote so much time and energy to producing television shows without visible rewards, by analyzing their perceptions regarding their efforts. The study employed a qualitative methodology, analyzing in-depth interview responses to develop perception "themes." In addition, in-studio participant observation data was collected using field notes. Results reaffirm previous research that indicates "play" is a medium perceived by students for learning production skills. In addition, the perception of learning is enhanced by student productions that exhibit qualities of flow experience. Therefore, the challenge for any academic instructor is to integrate experiences that can cause discoveries to be made by the student. This is not to say that conventional teaching methods should not be used but that they should be integrated with new experience-oriented approaches. (Contains 72 references.) (Author/TB)

Descriptors: Communication Research, Experiential Learning, Higher Education, Mass Media Role, Professional Development, Skill Development, Student Motivation, Student Needs, Television, Undergraduate Students











Author: Koehn, Stephen C.; Lowry, David N.

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=9538&id=ED379689



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