Objectionable Advertising: A Q-Sort Comparing the Perceptions of Baby Boomers and Generation X.Report as inadecuate




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A study examined similarities and differences between the reactions of Baby Boomers (age 29 to 47) and members of Generation X (age 17 to 28) to 35 objectionable magazine advertisements. In an earlier study, 29 students in an advertising campaigns course ranked the objectionable advertisements (identified by students in an introductory course) by means of a Q-sort followed by personal interviews. A convenience sample of 27 Baby Boomers (consisting mainly of business people and homemakers) was drawn from residents of central Indiana and Chicago, Illinois. The advertisements, of which the majority featured nudity and explicit sexual suggestiveness, were tested using a Q-sort, followed by a personal interview, to determine respondents' rankings of the advertisements and their reasoning. Two factors emerged from the sorts of the 27 Boomer respondents: "Thirtysomethings" (most of whom were in their 30s) and "Fortysomethings" (most of whom were in their 40s). Sorts of the earlier study indicated that two factors emerged for the students: "Feminists" and "Chauvinists." Comparison of results from both studies indicated that: (1) all factors but the Fortysomethings objected most to a series of three advertisements which graphically portrayed sexual encounters; (2) Thirtysomethings and Feminists felt that advertising which demeans women should be a thing of the past; (3) the Fortysomethings and Chauvinists strongly objected to advertising dealing with political and social issues; and (4) in interviews, both Boomers and Generation Xers explained their reasons for their Q-sorts in similar terms. (Contains 11 references, 26 notes, and four tables of data. An appendix of data is attached.) (RS)

Descriptors: Adults, Advertising, Baby Boomers, Higher Education, Mass Media Effects, Media Research, Q Methodology, Sexuality, Student Attitudes











Author: Gustafson, Robert L.; And Others

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=8786&id=ED375447







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