Noncognitive Predictors of Achievement in a General Education Course: A Multi-Institutional Study.Report as inadecuate




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This study investigated the efficacy of noncognitive variables for predicting college student achievement in an introductory psychology course. The sample included 102 new first-year students at a private urban university and 233 new first-year students at a rural public university. Data were collected on self-ratings of overall academic ability, drive to achieve, mathematical ability, self-confidence in intellectual ability, expectations of making at least a "B" average in college, expectations of graduating with honors, American College Test (ACT) composite scores, the number of years of high school mathematics completed, and the course grade. The study found that professional behavior: rational use of knowledge; personal directed interaction with people; operationally obtaining some results; and fulfilling conditions by provision with means. This self-confidence in intellectual ability were significantly correlated with subsequent psychology course grades among the students from the private urban university but not for students at the rural public university. (Contains 21 references.) (MDM)

Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Achievement Need, College Freshmen, Grade Prediction, Higher Education, Mathematical Aptitude, Predictor Variables, Private Colleges, Public Colleges, Rural Urban Differences, Self Concept, Self Esteem, Self Evaluation (Individuals), Standardized Tests











Author: House, J. Daniel; And Others

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=8585&id=ED390321







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