Attributions toward Violence of Male Juvenile Delinquents: A Concurrent Mixed-Methodological Analysis.Report as inadecuate




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This study investigated the causal attributions juvenile delinquents make for other's behavior and the salient pieces of information they use to arrive at these attributions. Participants were 82 male juvenile offenders selected through an a priori power analysis, drawn randomly from the population of juveniles incarcerated at a correctional facility in a southeastern state. A six-stage concurrent mixed methodology analysis, using both qualitative and quantitative data analysis techniques, revealed that juvenile offenders committed violence attributional errors nearly 53% of the time. Black juvenile offenders were more likely to commit violence attributional errors (inaccurate causal attributions) than were their White counterparts. A positive relationship was found between the number of prior arrests and the number of violence attributional errors. A phenomenological analysis revealed seven themes that arose from juveniles' reasons for their causal attributions: (1) self-control; (2) violation of rights; (3) provocation; (4) irresponsibility; (5) poor judgment; (6) fate; and (7) conflict resolution. A combination of these themes was related to age, ethnicity, and prior arrests. An exploratory factor analysis revealed that the seven themes fell into four meta themes. Ipsative/cluster analyses identified three profiles of delinquents based on their violence attribution reasons. The paper discusses the implications of these findings. (Contains 30 references, 4 tables, and 2 figures.) (SLD)

Descriptors: Adolescents, Attribution Theory, Delinquency, Institutionalized Persons, Males, Research Methodology, Violence











Author: Daley, Christine E.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=5732&id=ED460153



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