Competing Conceptions of Citizenship Education: Thomas Jesse Jones and Carter G. WoodsonReport as inadecuate




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International Journal of Social Education, v18 n2 p1-10 Fall-Win 2003-2004

In this article, the author synthesizes a collection of scholarship done by, and on, Thomas Jesse Jones and Carter G. Woodson as a source for understanding historical conceptions of citizenship education for African Americans. The author contends that Jones and Woodson played central roles in constructing competing conceptions of citizenship education for African Americans. Woodson's scholarship served a broader political purpose that encouraged black people to recognize the existence of oppression in their lives and helped to clarify the kind of citizenship knowledge and skills that were needed to challenge their subordination. In contrast, the paternalistic and racist approach to African American citizenship education developed by Jones was neither aimed at their overcoming second class citizenship nor was it universally accepted by the black community. The author concludes the article by discussing how the political and historical scope of Jones's and Woodson's work has much relevance to present-day discussions on education for citizenship in a pluralistic democracy. Although questions can be raised about the significance of examining such historical connections, the author maintains that because of the continuing divide that exists concerning the ideals of democratic citizenship education, there is value in understanding the nature of this history. In this article, the author focuses on a critical period in the history of social studies education from the African American perspective. (Contains 42 endnotes.)

Descriptors: Historians, History, African American Community, Citizenship Education, Citizenship, African Americans, Democracy

International Journal of Social Education, Department of History-BB209, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. Tel: 765-285-8621; Fax: 765-285-5612; e-mail: dcantu[at]bsu.edu.





Author: Dilworth, Paullette Patterson

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=5108&id=EJ718715







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