A Quantitative Synthesis of Response Card Research on Student Participation, Academic Achievement, Classroom Disruptive Behavior, and Student PreferenceReport as inadecuate




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Response cards are a teaching and learning tool designed to increase active student response during whole-class instruction. Response cards allow multiple students to write their answers on a white board and get feedback from the teacher during each learning trial. This work is a quantitative synthesis of the English-language student-level research on the effects of write-on response cards on willingness to participate, daily and weekly measures of academic achievement, in-class behavioral disruptions, and student preference. A comprehensive electronic and hand search was conducted to find relevant studies. The search yielded ten dissertations/theses and two original research articles that met the criteria for inclusion into the quantitative synthesis. The primary common metric was mean percent gain between the average score in the single-student oral response condition and the average score in the response card condition. Several study/subject characteristics were examined, including baseline performance, classification, and age as covariates. The overall results indicate educationally significant increases in willingness to participate, academic achievement on daily and weekly quizzes, and decreases in behavioral disruptions when using response cards compared to single-student oral responding. In addition, the majority of students preferred response cards to single-student oral responding. (Contains 5 tables.)

Descriptors: Responses, Student Participation, Academic Achievement, Student Attitudes, Instructional Effectiveness, Student Behavior, Behavior Problems, Teaching Methods, Feedback, Behavior Modification, Comparative Analysis, Meta Analysis, Classroom Communication, Written Language





Author: Randolph, Justus J.

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=4924&id=ED495706



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