Using Student Choice to Increase Students Knowledge of Research Methodology, Improve Their Attitudes toward Research, and Promote Acquisition of Professional SkillsReport as inadecuate




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International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, v26 n3 p381-392 2014

Students often approach their research methods course with dread typically because of the broad and abstract nature of the content. In the study presented here, we introduced a variety of student-driven, content-specific assignments that allowed for a more active learning experience when compared to the typical research methods course. Providing a range of student choice in the research methodology curriculum offers the advantage of incorporating an active learning approach as well as fostering an environment that promotes students' intrinsic motivation for learning the material. After completing this course, students reported a significant gain in skill acquisition and showed significant gains in knowledge of research methods, and they reported improved attitudes toward research. An examination of the pre-course student characteristics and their correlations with postcourse student characteristics suggests that this kind of approach to teaching was effective for a range of students. These findings lend support to the growing body of literature that suggests that students learn best when they are actively engaged in the process and are most intrinsically motivated when they feel they have autonomy over their learning.

Descriptors: Student College Relationship, Courses, Research Methodology, Active Learning, Student Motivation, Student Attitudes, Knowledge Level, Instructional Effectiveness, Comparative Analysis, Correlation, Personal Autonomy, Measures (Individuals), Attitude Change

International Society for Exploring Teaching and Learning. Web site: http://www.isetl.org/ijtlhe





Author: Hardway, Christina L.; Stroud, Michael

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=1005&id=EJ1060869







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