Teaching Problem-Solving Competency in Business Studies at Secondary School LevelReport as inadecuate




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South African Journal of Education, v35 n3 Article 1102 Aug 2015

The high unemployment rate in South Africa compels potential entrepreneurs to start their own businesses in order to survive. Often this is with little or no formal training or education in entrepreneurship. Since problem recognition and problem-solving are amongst the most crucial competencies required for a successful entrepreneurial career, this study aimed to determine whether the application of an extended curriculum with a strong focus on active learning in a business-simulated set-up will enhance this competency. The performance of a specific group of Grade 11 Business Studies learners in this study was measured, both before and after they had been exposed to such an extended curriculum in different experimental settings (intervention). Assessments were done qualitatively through observations and interviews, and quantitatively, by means of question-based scenarios. The findings revealed that the intervention enhanced learners' entrepreneurial competencies concerning problem recognition and problem-solving considerably. This also contributed to these learners' positive approach towards Business Studies. In this article, it is argued that practical exposure in a business-simulated set-up will not only result in enhanced entrepreneurial proficiency in school learners, but also contribute to an accelerated pace of economic growth and job creation in our country.

Descriptors: Secondary School Curriculum, Business Education, Problem Solving, Competency Based Education, Active Learning, Simulation, Case Method (Teaching Technique), Grade 11, Entrepreneurship, Control Groups, Experimental Groups, Pretests Posttests, Achievement Gains, Intervention, Interviews, Observation, Teaching Methods, Instructional Effectiveness, Foreign Countries, Quasiexperimental Design, Qualitative Research, Statistical Analysis

Education Association of South Africa. University of Pretoria, Centre for the Study of Resilience, Level 3, Groenkloof Student Centre, Department of Educational Psychology, Faculty of Education, George Storrar Road and Lleyds Street, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. Tel: +27-12-420-5798; Fax: +27-12-420-5511; Web site: http://www.sajournalofeducation.co.za/index.php/saje/index





Author: Meintjes, Aloe; Henrico, Alfred; Kroon, Japie

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=750&id=EJ1135028



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