How well suited are current thermodynamic models to predict or interpret the composition of Ba,SrSO4 solid-solutions in geothermal scalingsReport as inadecuate




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Geothermal Energy

, 5:9

Geothermal Fluids in Saline Systems

Abstract

In this study, we report results of the analysis of a particularly interesting scaling sample from the geothermal plant in Neustadt-Glewe in northern Germany, which contained 19% Galena PbS and 81% of a heterogeneous assemblage of Ba,SrSO4 crystals with varying compositions, 0.15 < XBa < 0.53. A main fraction of the sample ~56% has a barite content of XBa ≈ 0.32. We try to relate the solid composition of the Ba,SrSO4 solid-solution to the conditions at the geothermal plant concerning temperature, pressure, and solution composition, and discuss it with respect to the challenges in modelling the composition of Ba,SrSO4 solid-solutions on the basis of thermodynamic mixing models. We note that considerable uncertainties are related to the description of Ba,SrSO4 formation by means of thermodynamic models. The scaling composition observed in this study would be in line with endmember solubilities as predicted by the PhreeqC-Pitzer database for 70 °C and an interaction parameter, a0 = 1.6. According to such a model, the scaling heterogeneity would reflect bimodal precipitation behaviour due to various degrees of depletion of the brine with respect to XBaaq. Minor fluctuations in XBaaq: 0.0017 < XBaaq < 0.0042 explain the full range of observed solid compositions. The choice especially of the interaction parameter seems to some extent arbitrary. This knowledge gap strongly limits the interpretation of Ba,SrSO4 compositions. Thus, it is not possible to distinguish between kinetic and thermodynamic effects on partitioning or to use the solid-solution composition to draw conclusions about the precipitation conditions e.g. Temperature.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-s40517-017-0068-x contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Frank Heberling - Dieter Schild - Detlev Degering - Thorsten Schäfer

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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