Measuring obesity in children: what standards to use? Report as inadecuate




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Jornal de Pediatria 2006, 82 4

Author: Andrew Tomkins

Source: http://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=399738113003


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Jornal de Pediatria ISSN: 0021-7557 assessoria@jped.com.br Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria Brasil Tomkins, Andrew Measuring obesity in children: what standards to use? Jornal de Pediatria, vol.
82, núm.
4, julio-agosto, 2006, pp.
246-248 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria Porto Alegre, Brasil Available in: http:--www.redalyc.org-articulo.oa?id=399738113003 How to cite Complete issue More information about this article Journals homepage in redalyc.org Scientific Information System Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal Non-profit academic project, developed under the open access initiative 246 Jornal de Pediatria - Vol.
82, No.4, 2006 Measuring obesity in children – Tomkins A Measuring obesity in children: what standards to use? Andrew Tomkins* Childhood obesity is of increasing public health differences rather than genetic predisposition is still concern because of the rapidly increasing prevalence in disputed.
The third is puberty.
There are clear differences many countries worldwide.1 Obesity contributes to early in body shape between boys and girls and the age at heart disease, the metabolic syndrome including which puberty occurs changes the shape of any age- hyperlipidemia and diabetes, hypertension and stroke.2 specific BMI curve. Policies and programs for improving the nutrition and health of children can only really be developed on an evidence base if there is some information on how many children are overweight and how much A key question remains to be addressed at national and international levels – what standards should be used for diagnosing overweight among children? In May 2000, an important paper was their health risk is increased by being published by Cole and colleagues at a specified level of overweight or frank obesity.
Among adults this is relatively easy because of the wellestablished statistical risk of early describing weight and height at See related article on page ...





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