Gender difference in preference of specialty as a career choice among Japanese medical studentsReport as inadecuate




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BMC Medical Education

, 16:288

Career choice, professional education and development

Abstract

BackgroundIn Japan, the absolute deficiency of doctors and maldistribution of doctors by specialty is a significant problem in the Japanese health care system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors contributing to specialty preference in career choice among Japanese medical students.

MethodsA total of 368 medical students completed the survey giving an 88.2 % response rate. The subjects comprised 141 women aged 21 ± 3 range, 18–34 years and 227 men aged 22 ± 4 range, 18–44 years. Binary Logistic regression analysis was performed using specialty preferences as the criterion variable and the factors in brackets as six motivational variables e.g., Factor 1: educational experience; Factor 2: job security; Factor 3: advice from others; Factor 4: work-life balance; Factor 5: technical and research specialty; and Factor 6: personal reasons.

ResultsWomen significantly preferred pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, and psychology than the men. Men significantly preferred surgery and orthopedics than the women. For both genders, a high odds ratio OR of -technical and research specialty- and a low OR for -personal reasons- were associated with preference for surgery. -Technical and research specialty- was positively associated with preference for special internal medicine and negatively for pediatrics. -Work-life balance- was positively associated with preference for psychology and negatively for emergency medicine. Among the women only -technical and research specialty- was negatively associated with preference for general medicine-family medicine and obstetrics and gynecology, and -job security- was positively associated for general medicine-family medicine and negatively for psychology. Among men only -educational experience- and -personal reasons- were positively, and -job security- was negatively associated with preference for pediatrics. For both genders -work-life balance- was positively associated with preference for controllable lifestyle specialties.

ConclusionWe must acknowledge that Japanese medical students have dichotomized some motivations for their specialty preference based on gender. Systematic improvements in the working environment are necessary to solve these issues.

KeywordsCareer choice Gender difference Japanese medical students  Download fulltext PDF



Author: Ryuichi Kawamoto - Daisuke Ninomiya - Yoshihisa Kasai - Tomo Kusunoki - Nobuyuki Ohtsuka - Teru Kumagi - Masanori Abe

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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