Characteristics of spinal microglia in aged and obese mice: potential contributions to impaired sensory behaviorReport as inadecuate




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Immunity and Ageing

, 12:22

First Online: 24 November 2015Received: 29 July 2015Accepted: 12 November 2015

Abstract

BackgroundBoth aging and obesity have been recognized widely as health conditions that profoundly affect individuals, families and the society. Aged and obese people often report altered pain responses while underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We aim to understand whether spinal microglia could potentially contribute to altered sensory behavior in aged and obese population.

ResultsIn this study, we monitored pain behavior in adult 6 months and aged 17 months mice fed with diet containing 10 % or 60 % Kcal fat. The group of young adult 3 months mice was included as theoretical baseline control. Compared with lean adult animals, diet-induced-obese DIO adult, lean and DIO-aged mice showed enhanced painful response to heat and cold stimuli, while exhibiting hyposensitivity to mechanical stimulation. The impact of aging and obesity on microglia properties was evidenced by an increased microglial cell density in the spinal cords, stereotypic morphological changes and polarization towards pro-inflammatory phenotype. Obesity strikingly exacerbated the effect of aging on spinal microglia.

ConclusionAging-obesity altered microglia properties in the spinal cords, which can dysregulate neuron-microglia crosstalk and impair physiological pain signal transmission. The inflammatory functions of microglia have special relevance for understanding of abnormal pain behavior in aged-obese populations.

KeywordsAging Obesity Microglia Pain Spinal cord Inflammation  Download fulltext PDF



Author: SeungHwan Lee - YaSi Wu - Xiang Qun Shi - Ji Zhang

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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