Specific dynamic action, postprandial thermophily, and the impact of temperature on gastric digestion in the cornsnake Pantherophis guttatusReport as inadecuate




Specific dynamic action, postprandial thermophily, and the impact of temperature on gastric digestion in the cornsnake Pantherophis guttatus - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Zoological Studies

, 52:33

First Online: 07 October 2013Received: 10 January 2012Accepted: 22 March 2013

Abstract

BackgroundThe purpose of this work was to study the role of feeding on the energetics of cornsnakes.

ResultsWe measured oxygen consumption in cornsnakes prior to a meal and 6, 15, 20, 30, 40, 48, 72, and 96 h after eating a meal that was equivalent to 10% of the snake-s body mass. We monitored temperature selection of individual cornsnakes in a thermal gradient in the spring and again in the fall when snakes were starved, digesting a meal equivalent to 10% of its body mass, and digesting a meal equivalent to 25% of its body mass. We measured the gastric digestion rate by monitoring the passage of magnetic stir bars, placed inside a mouse meal, through the digestive tracts of cornsnakes maintained at 22°C, 25°C, 28°C, and 32°C.

ConclusionsOxygen consumption peaked at 2.3 times higher than baseline levels 24 h after feeding and had returned to pre-feeding levels by 72 h. Meal size affected temperature selection in both seasons; in fall, starved snakes selected lower body temperatures than fed snakes, but meal size had no effect on temperature selection by fed snakes. Passage rates from the stomach to the intestine did not significantly differ among the temperatures studied.

KeywordsEnergetics Snake Thermophily Digestion Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1810-522X-52-33 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Download fulltext PDF



Author: Lynnette M Sievert - Yusuke Suita - Daphne M Mayes - Lynett R Bontrager - Michelle Tuttle - Ashley Everly

Source: https://link.springer.com/







Related documents