Supplementation of arachidonic acid-enriched oil increases arachidonic acid contents in plasma phospholipids, but does not increase their metabolites and clinical parameters in Japanese healthy elderly individuals: a randomized coReport as inadecuate




Supplementation of arachidonic acid-enriched oil increases arachidonic acid contents in plasma phospholipids, but does not increase their metabolites and clinical parameters in Japanese healthy elderly individuals: a randomized co - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Lipids in Health and Disease

, 10:241

First Online: 22 December 2011Received: 06 December 2011Accepted: 22 December 2011

Abstract

BackgroundThe importance of arachidonic acid ARA among the elderly has recently gained increased attention. The effects of ARA supplementation in the elderly are not fully understood, although ARA is considered to be associated with various diseases. We investigate whether ARA supplementation to Japanese elderly subjects affects clinical parameters involved in cardiovascular, inflammatory, and allergic diseases. We also examine the levels of ARA metabolites such as prostanoids during intervention.

MethodsWe conducted a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled parallel group intervention trial. ARA-enriched oil 240 or 720 mg ARA per day or placebo was administered to Japanese healthy men and women aged 55-70 years for 4 weeks followed by a 4-week washout period. The fatty acid contents of plasma phospholipids, clinical parameters, and ARA metabolites were determined at baseline, 2, 4, and 8 weeks.

ResultsThe ARA content in plasma phospholipids in the ARA-administrated groups increased dose-dependently and was almost the same at 2 weeks and at 4 weeks. The elevated ARA content decreased to nearly baseline during a 4-week washout period. During the supplementation and washout periods, no changes were observed in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid contents. There were no changes in clinical blood parameters related to cardiovascular, inflammatory and allergic diseases. ARA supplementation did not alter the level of ARA metabolites such as urinary 11-dehydro thromboxane B2, 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin PG F1α and 9,15-dioxo-11α-hydroxy-13,14-dihydro-2,3,4,5-tetranor-prostan-1,20-dioic acid tetranor-PGEM, and plasma PGE2 and lipoxin A4. ARA in plasma phospholipids was not correlated with ARA metabolite levels in the blood or urine.

ConclusionThese results indicate that ARA supplementation, even at a relatively high dose, does not increase ARA metabolites, and suggest that it does not induce cardiovascular, inflammatory or allergic diseases in Japanese elderly individuals.

Keywordsarachidonic acid thromboxane A2 prostacyclin prostaglandin E2 cardiovascular diseases inflammation Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1476-511X-10-241 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Saki Kakutani - Yoshiyuki Ishikura - Norifumi Tateishi - Chika Horikawa - Hisanori Tokuda - Masanori Kontani - Hiroshi Kawa

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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