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Mon Apr 03 04:38:06 2017 1 Project Gutenberg’s The Seven Champions of Christendom, by W.
H.
G.
Kingston This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: The Seven Champions of Christendom Author: W.
H.
G.
Kingston Release Date: May 15, 2007 [EBook #21454] Language: English Character set encoding: ASCII *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE SEVEN CHAMPIONS OF CHRISTENDOM *** Produced by Nick Hodson of London, England The Seven Champions of Christendom, by W H G Kingston. ________________________________________________________________________ A most unusual book, especially from this author, erudite though he is. The seven champions are the Patron Saints of England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, France, Italy and Spain.
These rove about Europe and beyond, slaying Enchanters, Dragons, and other nuisances, accompanied by their Squires, who, although they put on weight and become obese, help as best they can, and carry their masters’ trophies for them. That they all knew one another and were living at the same time is a novel idea, but it all adds to quite a good story, however whimsical. It is alleged that the book is no more than an edited transcription of a book written at the end of the fifteen hundreds.
It may well be, but it stands quite well on its own for what it is--an amusement for the children: that, and no more. ________________________________________________________________________ THE SEVEN CHAMPIONS OF CHRISTENDOM, BY W H G KINGSTON. The following pages should not go forth into the world without due acknowledgment being made to that worthy old Dominie, Richard Johnson, to whose erudite but somewhat unreadable work the author is so largely indebted.
As he flourished at the end of the sixteenth century, and the commencement of the seventeent...





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