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Mon Apr 03 02:03:29 2017 1 Project Gutenberg’s Myths and Legends of Christmastide, by Bertha F.
Herrick This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Myths and Legends of Christmastide Author: Bertha F.
Herrick Release Date: December 26, 2007 [EBook #24044] Language: English Character set encoding: ASCII *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MYTHS AND LEGENDS OF CHRISTMASTIDE *** Produced by Irma Spehar and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http:--www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images generously made available by The Internet Archive-American Libraries.) MYTHS AND LEGENDS OF CHRISTMASTIDE BY BERTHA F.
HERRICK [Illustration] SAN FRANCISCO PRINTED BY THE STANLEY-TAYLOR COMPANY 1901 The following article originally appeared in one of the Christmas editions of the _San Francisco Chronicle_ and is now reprinted by permission from that journal. MYTHS AND LEGENDS OF CHRISTMASTIDE -Lo! now is come our joyful’st feast, Let every man be jolly. Each room with ivy leaves is drest, And every post with holly. Now all our neighbors’ chimneys smoke, And Christmas blocks are burning; Their ovens they with bak’t meats choke, And all their spits are turning.- Mon Apr 03 02:03:29 2017 2 The celebration of Christmas, which was considered by the Puritans to be idolatrous, has for many centuries been so universal that it may prove of interest to contrast the rites, ceremonies and quaint beliefs of foreign lands with those of matter-of-fact America. Many curious customs live only in tradition; but it is surprising to find what singular superstitions still exist among credulous classes, even in the light of the twentieth century. In certain parts of England the peasantry formerly asserted that, on the anniversary of the Nativity, oxen knelt ...





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