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Sat Apr 01 16:37:59 2017 1 The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, April 1844, by Various This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, April 1844 Volume 23, Number 4 Author: Various Editor: Lewis Gaylord Clark Release Date: March 17, 2007 [EBook #20845] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE KNICKERBOCKER *** Produced by Barbara Tozier, Bill Tozier and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http:--www.pgdp.net T H E VOL.
XXIII. K N I C K E R B O C K E R. APRIL, 1844. NO.
4. A PILGRIMAGE TO PENSHURST. BY C.
A.
ALEXANDER. One of the admirers of Gothe, commenting on his characteristic excellencies, has remarked that he is the most _suggestive_ of writers. Were we to seek an epithet by which to describe the architectural remains and historical monuments of England, with reference to their impression on the mind of an observer, perhaps no better could offer itself than that which has been thus applied to the works of the great German.
In the property of awakening reflection by bringing before the mind that series of events whose connection with the progress of modern civilization has been most direct and influential, and of recalling names which, to the American at least, sound like household words, they stand unrivalled.
Our manners, our customs, our national constitution itself, may be said to have grown up beneath the shelter of these venerable structures, whose associations ally them in a manner scarcely less striking with those wider developments of social and political reason in which we believe the welfare of our species to be involved.
Who is there, that, standing within ’the great hall of Willi...





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