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Sat Apr 01 16:37:25 2017 1 The Project Gutenberg EBook of Libraries in the Medieval and Renaissance Periods, by J.
W.
Clark This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Libraries in the Medieval and Renaissance Periods The Rede Lecture Delivered June 13, 1894 Author: J.
W.
Clark Release Date: October 1, 2006 [EBook #19415] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MEDIEVAL LIBRARIES *** Produced by Barbara Tozier, Bill Tozier, Christine D.
and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http:--www.pgdp.net [Illustration: FIG.
2.
General view of part of the Library attached to the Church of S.
Wallberg at Zutphen. _Frontispiece_] LIBRARIES IN THE MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE PERIODS. _THE REDE LECTURE, DELIVERED JUNE 13, 1894_ BY J.W.
CLARK, M.A., F.S.A. REGISTRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY, AND FORMERLY FELLOW OF TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE. CAMBRIDGE: MACMILLAN AND BOWES. 1894 Sat Apr 01 16:37:25 2017 2 _The lecture was illustrated by lantern-slides.
A brief notice of each of these is printed in the text in Italics at the place in the lecture where the slide was exhibited._ LIBRARIES. A library may be considered from two very different points of view: as a workshop, or as a Museum. The former commends itself to the practical turn of mind characteristic of the present day; common sense urges that mechanical ingenuity, which has done so much in other directions, should be employed in making the acquisition of knowledge less cumbrous and less tedious; that as we travel by steam, so we should also read by steam, and be helped in our studies by the varied resources of modern invention.
There lies on my table at this present moment a _Handbook of Library Appliances_, in which fifty-three closely printed pages are...





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